Music Update for the Week of November 1

The full Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys will sing choral services on Sunday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of this week. Music for the 11am Solemn Eucharist and 4pm Solemn Evensong on Sunday the 1st include works by Victoria, Byrd, Rose, Stanford, and Harwood.

Sunday November 1

11am Solemn Eucharist

  • Service: Missa O Quam Gloriosum, Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)
  • Psalm: 24 Anglican Chant (Barnby)
  • Anthem: Gaudeamus omnes in Domino, William Byrd (c. 1540-1623)
  • Anthem: O quam gloriosum, Tomás Luis de Victoria

4pm Solemn Evensong

  • Responses: Bernard Rose (1916-1996)
  • Psalm: 148 Anglican Chant (Willcocks)
  • Magnificat & Nunc dimittis: in C, Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
  • Anthem: O how glorious, Basil Harwood (1859-1949)

Tuesday, November 3

5:30pm Choral Evensong

  • Introit: Gaudent in coelis , Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)
  • Responses: Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625) and John Barnard (early 17th century)
  • Psalm: 18:1-30 (From the Prayerbook, Page 359) Anglican Chant (Walmisley, Wesley)
  • Magnificat & Nunc dimittis: The Sixth Service, Thomas Weelkes (1576-1623)
  • Anthem: Justorum animae, William Byrd (c. 1540-1623)

Wednesday, November 4

5:30pm Choral Evensong

  • Introit: Gaudent in coelis , Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548-1611)
  • Responses: Orlando Gibbons (1583-1625) and John Barnard (early 17th century)
  • Psalm: 22, 23 Anglican Chant (Wesley, Smart, Hylton Stewart)
  • Magnificat & Nunc dimittis: in E, Sydney Watson (1903-1991)
  • Anthem: May Choirs of Angels receive him – Jonathan Bielby (b. 1944) – first performance

Notes on Sunday’s Repertoire

Tomás Luis de Victoria was born in Avila, Spain in 1548. He began his musical studies as a chorister at Avila Cathedral and moved to Rome in 1565. Having taken Holy Orders in 1575, Victoria continued to work as a musician, composer and priest in Rome until he returned to Spain as Chaplain to the Empress Maria in 1587. His work at the Empress’s Monasterio de las Descalzas de S. Clara in Madrid included the role of Maestro de Capilla, and many of the composer’s later masses were written for the choir of boys and priests that he directed there.

The Missa O quam gloriosum was published in 1583 and is based on the motet of the same name by Victoria. The text for the motet is taken from the Magnificat Antiphon for the Feast of All Saints and the themes for the Mass setting are derived from motifs in the motet. In the conventional style of the parody mass (a form particularly common in the 16th century), the composer selects motifs with a mind to the text of the various sections of the mass, and with his characteristic Spanish flair Victoria breathes new life and purpose into the pre-composed themes.

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